Cleveland scored in the second on a fielder’s choice by Trevor Crowe and a fielding error by White Sox starter Edwin Jackson, Crowe stole his 20th base of the season but was left stranded. Crowe’s 20 stolen bases gives Cleveland two with 20 steals. He joins Shin-Soo Choo.

One argument that is often used for keeping instant replay out of Major League Baseball is the “human element” that is involved in the game. The umpires are the first and only word when it comes to making calls out on the field. A bad call on a bang-bang play or different strike zones among empires could definitely change the course of a ballgame but that is the way the game has been played for a century and a half. Traditionalists would argue that baseball is as old fashioned a sport as you can get and the game should continue to be played in the same fashion.

I’d argue Randy Williams went through stretches like that because he wasn’t very good, but Jim is certainly right that Ohman is actually the fourth-most effective reliever against lefties in the team’s bullpen. His lone job likely will be solely to retire left-handers, and those situations likely will be earlier in games (like, the sixth inning).

That’s not the point, though. What if this would have been a playoff game or even a World Series game? If this same instance took place in game seven of the world Series fans would want the call to be correct. It wouldn’t matter how the correct call would come to be.

I would keep instant replay away from judgment calls such as whether a runner is safe or out. I would also not use it for balls and strikes. This way, the human element remains in the game and replay is only used when it is absolutely necessary. A play will only come under review when the umpires feel it necessary to do so. Umpires will be evaluated in the same manner they are now. Those that make too many mistakes will not be available to work postseason games and thus will lose out on bigger paychecks.

What worries me is that I’m not sure Owens will be able to simply hit the ball harder. His extra-base numbers in the minor leagues are not impressive: 24 in 2006, 13 in 2007, 12 in 2008 (all with AAA Charlotte). He may not have it in him to get 30+ extra base hits in a season, so if he’s going to stick for at least a year, he has to turn himself into an on-base machine.

It’s no secret that Miguel Cabrera is off to an incredible start, but the Tigers are also getting major contributions from Brandon Inge, who appears to be reborn in his return to third base. Last season, Inge hit .263 in 13 games against the sale jerseys, striking out 12 times and registering only five RBIs. Inge’s performance could play an enormous role on the outcome of this series.

Zach Miner, who will get the ball for the hometown team Monday, went 2-1 against Chicago in 2008, posting a 3.94 ERA in five appearances against the Sox.